GLOBAL ASTHMA BURDEN

 

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Diagnosing Asthma in Children

There is no single reliable test (“gold standard”) and there are no standardised diagnostic criteria for asthma. Episodic respiratory symptoms that suggest asthma include: wheezing, difficulty breathing, feeling of tightness in chest, cough

It can be difficult to diagnose asthma in preschool children 0 – 6 as they cannot properly perform spirometry lung function tests

Ref: Asthmahandbook.org.au/diagnosis/children

Managing Asthma in Children

Effective home monitoring, objective monitoring of wheeze, electronic asthma diary

  • Written asthma action plan
  • Assess and avoid triggers
  • Correct use of medicines including inhaler technique
  • Manage flare-ups when they occur
  • Monitor pattern of symptoms (including frequency of episodes and pattern of symptoms between episodes

Ref: asthmahandbook.org.au/management/children

HOW AIRSONEA CAN WORK AS A PART OF YOUR ASTHMA MANAGEMENT PLAN

Self-monitoring is important when it comes to managing your asthma worries, but traditional methods can be difficult for busy families.

Now AirSonea® helps you effortlessly monitor your child’s asthma in ways that have never been available before.
Developed by leading respiratory specialists, AirSonea is a ‘digital stethoscope’ and smartphone app that accurately records breathing sounds to detect and measure wheeze, one of the signs and symptoms of asthma.

With automatic diary entry of WheezeRATE™ results, the AirSonea app also allows you to log your child’s asthma symptoms and triggers and medication use to provide an invaluable overview synced in the Cloud for review and sharing.
Sharing this objective data with your doctor can help in the evaluation of your child’s WheezeRATE trend and asthma management plan.

Self-monitoring with AirSonea eliminates the guesswork and increases your awareness and knowledge of how asthma affects your child, helping you better adhere to the asthma management plan and manage your asthma worries.

 

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I’m a mother of a child with asthma. I am constantly worrying about my child’s health and wondering when the next attack will occur and what will trigger it.

I get frustrated with the difficulty I have in articulating to the doctor the severity of my child’s symptoms.

The pressures of day-to-day life get in the way and we tend to react to an asthma attack, rather being ‘proactive’ in management.